forbid, prohibit

 The words have the same meaning, but the construction of sentences often dictates which should be used. Forbid may be followed only by to ("I forbid you to go"). Prohibit may not be followed by to, but only by from ("He was prohibited from going") or by an object noun ("The law prohibits the construction of houses without planning consent"). Thus the following is wrong: "They are forbidden from uttering any public comments." Make it either "They are prohibited from uttering.. ." or "They are forbidden to utter.. ." A small additional point is that forbid’s past tense form, forbade, has the preferred pronunciation for-bad, not for-bade.

Bryson’s dictionary for writers and editors. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • forbid, prohibit —    The words have the same meaning, but the construction of sentences often dictates which should be used. In prepositional constructions,y^r^^ may be followed only by to ( I forbid you to go ). Prohibit may not be followed by to but only by from …   Dictionary of troublesome word

  • forbid — forbid, prohibit, enjoin, interdict, inhibit, ban are comparable when meaning to debar a person from using, doing, or entering or to order something not be used, done, or entered. Forbid is the more direct and familiar, prohibit, the more formal… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • forbid — (v.) O.E. forbeodan forbid, prohibit, from FOR (Cf. for ) against + beodan to command (see BID (Cf. bid)). Common Germanic compound (Cf. Du. verbieden, O.H.G. farbiotan, Ger. verbieten, O.N. fyrirbjoða, Goth …   Etymology dictionary

  • forbid — I. transitive verb (forbade; also forbad; forbidden; bidding) Etymology: Middle English forbidden, from Old English forbēodan, from for + bēodan to bid more at bid Date: before 12th century 1. to proscribe from or as if from the position of one… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Prohibit — Pro*hib it, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Prohibited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Prohibiting}.] [L. prohibitus, p. p. of prohibere to prohibit; pro before, forth + habere to have, hold. See {Habit}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To forbid by authority; to interdict; as, God… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Forbid — For*bid (f[o^]r*b[i^]d ), v. t. [imp. {Forbade} (f[o^]r*b[a^]d ); p. p. {Forbidden} (f[o^]r*b[i^]d d n) ({Forbid}, [Obs.]); p. pr. & vb. n. {Forbidding} (f[o^]r*b[i^]d d[i^]ng).] [OE. forbeden, AS. forbe[ o]dan; pref. for + be[ o]dan to bid; akin …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • prohibit — I verb ban, banish, bar, block, check, circumscribe, control, counteract, curb, debar, deny, disallow, disqualify, embargo, enjoin, exclude, forbid, foreclose, forfend, gainsay, halt, hamper, hinder, impede, inhibit, interdict, interfere, limit,… …   Law dictionary

  • forbid — I verb ban, bar, block, check, command not to do, debar, declare illegal, deny, deny permission, deprive, deter, disallow, disapprove, discountenance, discourage, enjoin, exclude, forfend, hinder, impede, inhibit, interdicere, interdict, make… …   Law dictionary

  • forbid — [fər bid′, fôrbid′] vt. forbade or forbad, forbidden or Archaic forbid, forbidding [ME forbeden < OE forbeodan: see FOR & BID1] 1. to rule against; not permit; prohibit 2. to command to stay away from; exclude or bar from …   English World dictionary

  • prohibit — [prō hib′it, prəhib′it] vt. [ME prohibeten < L prohibitus, pp. of prohibere, to prohibit < pro , before (see PRO 2) + habere, to have (see HABIT)] 1. to refuse to permit; forbid by law or by an order 2. to prevent; hinder SYN. FORBID… …   English World dictionary

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